Welcome to Miawpukek First Nation!

Great SealWelcome!

Miawpukek Mi’kamawey Mawi’omi is a First Nation Reserve located at the mouth of the Conne River on the south coast of the island of Newfoundland. Over the years the community has seen a steady growth in Government, Social reforms, Health, Education, Economic Development, Culture and Traditions. We believe that we will “secure our future by investing in our past.”

Miawpukek First Nation Mission Statement
Our Mission Is To Preserve, Promote And Advance

The Culture, Health, Economic, Educational And
Social Well-Being Of Our People – Including
Our Language, History And Spirituality.

 


 

/mfngov

3 days ago

Miawpukek Mi'kamawey Mawi'omi

November 15, 2017 - Funding Announcement

Chief Misel Joe would like to thank everyone who attended this morning's funding announcement regarding the remediation of Claybank.

Thank you to MP Scott Simms; Kevin Anderson - RDG Department of Fisheries & Oceans; Jackie Perry & Jason Kelly.
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3 days ago

Miawpukek Mi'kamawey Mawi'omi

Chief & Council would like to thank those who attended the Remembrance Day ceremony on November 11, 2017 and Colleen Lambert and her team for organizing.

Although the ceremony was extremely short, it was just a meaningful.

The willingness of our veterans to sacrifice so much has earned them our everlasting gratitude and respect.
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Comment on Facebook

Just wish they had wait a few minutes for people to get out of church so we could attend.

I know Maggie. I wanted to be there for my dad ,and my 2 brothers but I was at the Funeral for Mrs. John.

3 days ago

Miawpukek Mi'kamawey Mawi'omi

Claybank - Miawpukek First Nation

The funding provided by DFO (Department of Fisheries & Oceans) assisted MAMKA with the work being done to
re-mediate Claybank.

Claybank is located along the shoreline at the McDonalds Recreation area (new school / Powwow site).

The pictures show the before and after.

Chief & Council would like to commend the great work completed by the crew (Netukalimk Contracting Ltd.; Corey Jeddore; Levi Burt; Levi Hinks; Barry Benoit; Colin Benoit; Elmer Cornish)

Great Job!!
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Claybank - Miawpukek First Nation 

The funding provided by DFO (Department of Fisheries & Oceans) assisted MAMKA with the work being done to  
re-mediate Claybank. 

Claybank is located along the shoreline at the McDonalds Recreation area (new school / Powwow site).

The pictures show the before and after.

Chief & Council would like to commend the great work completed by the crew (Netukalimk Contracting Ltd.; Corey Jeddore; Levi Burt; Levi Hinks; Barry Benoit; Colin Benoit; Elmer Cornish)

Great Job!!Image attachment

 

Comment on Facebook

Good job good for walking

Don't forget the great work done by the students the past 2 summers!!

Big difference for only cuple years.Good job by all...

I can't name names because I don't know them and I don't want to leave anyone out. I walk there every day and there has been three trail crew I've seen working there recently that's doing a great job! Well done all!!❤️🙏

Good job along the shore. Now find some clinging roots greenery to replace what was cut for that walking trail along the top.

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Funding Announcement - DFO

Please be advised that there is an official announcement scheduled for 11:00 am this morning (Nov 15th) in the Great Hall.

MP (Member of Parliament) Scott Simms will be here to make the official funding announcement on behalf of the the Department of Fisheries & Oceans Coastal Restoration Fund (CRF).

This funding is for the Clay Bank Remediation Project.
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Funding Announcement - DFO 

Please be advised that there is an official announcement scheduled for 11:00 am this morning (Nov 15th) in the Great Hall. 

MP (Member of Parliament) Scott Simms will be here to make the official funding announcement on behalf of the the Department of Fisheries & Oceans Coastal Restoration Fund (CRF). 

This funding is for the Clay Bank Remediation Project.

 

Comment on Facebook

First time seeing this!!

 

Comment on Facebook

Plenty of people cannot get the flu vaccine for various health reasons. Herd immunity helps protect the sick and weak folks by not passing the flu to unprotected people. Please do not believe these celebrities and sites who claim vaccines are harmful - they protect all of us!

 

Comment on Facebook

First time seeing this?

Same here Maggie

The Annual Christmas concert at our new school is scheduled for Thursday, December 14, 2017 beginning at 1:15pm.

The concert involves all students from Kindergarten to Grade six as well as all the Music/Drama soloists, ensembles and choirs in the high school.

Hope to see you there!
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The Annual Christmas concert at our new school is scheduled for Thursday, December 14, 2017 beginning at 1:15pm. 

The concert involves all students from Kindergarten to Grade six as well as all the Music/Drama soloists, ensembles and choirs in the  high school. 

Hope to see you there!

1. What does the poppy stand for?

The remembrance poppy was inspired by the World War I poem "In Flanders Fields". Its opening lines refer to the many poppies that were the first flowers to grow in the churned-up earth of soldiers' graves in Flanders, a region of Europe that overlies a part of Belgium.

2. Why is Remembrance Day celebrated on the 11th?

Armistice Day is on 11 November and is also known as Remembrance Day. It marks the day World War One ended, at 11am on the 11th day of the 11th month, back in 1918. A two-minute silence is held at 11am to remember the people who have died in wars

3. Why do we wear the poppy?

The reason poppies are used to remember those who have given their lives in battle is because they are the flowers which grew on the battlefields after World War One ended. This is described in the famous World War One poem In Flanders Fields, which you can read below.

4. Why did poppies grow on battle fields?

The poppy has a long association with Remembrance Day. ... Once the conflict was over the poppy was one of the only plants to grow on the otherwise barren battlefields. The significance of the poppy as a lasting memorial symbol to the fallen was realized by the Canadian surgeon John McCrae in his poem In Flanders Fields.

5. Where are the fields of Flanders?

Flanders Field American Cemetery and Memorial is a World War I cemetery on the southeast edge of the town of Waregem, Belgium

Poppy flowers began to grow after the burial of the fallen soldiers. In Flanders Fields is a famous poem about World War I written by Canadian Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae.
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1. What does the poppy stand for? 

The remembrance poppy was inspired by the World War I poem In Flanders Fields. Its opening lines refer to the many poppies that were the first flowers to grow in the churned-up earth of soldiers graves in Flanders, a region of Europe that overlies a part of Belgium.

2. Why is Remembrance Day celebrated on the 11th? 

Armistice Day is on 11 November and is also known as Remembrance Day. It marks the day World War One ended, at 11am on the 11th day of the 11th month, back in 1918. A two-minute silence is held at 11am to remember the people who have died in wars

3. Why do we wear the poppy?

The reason poppies are used to remember those who have given their lives in battle is because they are the flowers which grew on the battlefields after World War One ended. This is described in the famous World War One poem In Flanders Fields, which you can read below.

4. Why did poppies grow on battle fields? 

The poppy has a long association with Remembrance Day. ... Once the conflict was over the poppy was one of the only plants to grow on the otherwise barren battlefields. The significance of the poppy as a lasting memorial symbol to the fallen was realized by the Canadian surgeon John McCrae in his poem In Flanders Fields.

5. Where are the fields of Flanders?

Flanders Field American Cemetery and Memorial is a World War I cemetery on the southeast edge of the town of Waregem, Belgium 

Poppy flowers began to grow after the burial of the fallen soldiers. In Flanders Fields is a famous poem about World War I written by Canadian Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae.

Remembrance Day, also known as Poppy Day or Armistice Day is a memorial day observed in Commonwealth countries since the end of World War I to remember the members of their armed forces who died in the line of duty.

This day, or alternative dates, are also recognized as special days for war remembrances in many non-Commonwealth countries.

Remembrance Day is observed on November 11th to recall the end of hostilities of World War I on that date in 1918. Hostilities formally ended "at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month," in accordance with the Armistice, signed by representatives of Germany and the Entente between 5:12 and 5:20 that morning. (“At the 11th hour" refers to the passing of the 11th hour, or 11:00 am.) World War I officially ended with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles on 28 June 1919.

The day was specifically dedicated by King George V on the 7th of November 1919 as a day of remembrance for members of the armed forces who were killed during World War I.

The Initial or very first Armistice Day was held at Buckingham Palace commencing with King George V hosting a "Banquet in Honour of the President of the French Republic” during the evening hours of 10 November 1919. The first official Armistice Day was subsequently held on the grounds of Buckingham Palace on the morning of November 11, 1919.

This would set the trend for a day of Remembrance for decades to come.

The red remembrance poppy has become a familiar emblem of Remembrance Day due to the poem "In Flanders Fields".

These poppies bloomed across some of the worst battlefields of Flanders in World War I, their brilliant red color an appropriate symbol for the blood spilled in the war.

We owe so much to those who are no longer with us for the lives we live.
... See MoreSee Less

Remembrance Day, also known as Poppy Day or Armistice Day is a memorial day observed in Commonwealth countries since the end of World War I to remember the members of their armed forces who died in the line of duty. 

This day, or alternative dates, are also recognized as special days for war remembrances in many non-Commonwealth countries. 

Remembrance Day is observed on November 11th to recall the end of hostilities of World War I on that date in 1918. Hostilities formally ended at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, in accordance with the Armistice, signed by representatives of Germany and the Entente between 5:12 and 5:20 that morning. (“At the 11th hour refers to the passing of the 11th hour, or 11:00 am.) World War I officially ended with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles on 28 June 1919.

The day was specifically dedicated by King George V on the 7th of November 1919 as a day of remembrance for members of the armed forces who were killed during World War I.

The Initial or very first Armistice Day was held at Buckingham Palace commencing with King George V hosting a Banquet in Honour of the President of the French Republic” during the evening hours of 10 November 1919. The first official Armistice Day was subsequently held on the grounds of Buckingham Palace on the morning of November 11, 1919. 

This would set the trend for a day of Remembrance for decades to come.

The red remembrance poppy has become a familiar emblem of Remembrance Day due to the poem In Flanders Fields. 

These poppies bloomed across some of the worst battlefields of Flanders in World War I, their brilliant red color an appropriate symbol for the blood spilled in the war.

We owe so much to those who are no longer with us for the lives we live.

 

Comment on Facebook

Unfortunately the ceremony was over by the time we got there from the funeral at 11:10. I really wanted to attend but just couldn't be in two places at once. Remembering my Dad today and all the others who have served and are serving.🙏❤️

REMEMBRANCE DAY CEREMONY

At the advice of community members, MFN's Remembrance Day Ceremony will proceed as originally planned for Saturday, November 11th.

The ceremony will commence at 10:55am with 'O Canada' followed by the Rouse and 2 minutes of silence.

All are welcome to attend and honor Our Fallen.

We ask those attending to add a poppy to the large wreath at the memorial site.

We apologize for any confusion or inconvenience caused and we look forward to seeing you there.
... See MoreSee Less

REMEMBRANCE DAY CEREMONY 

At the advice of community members, MFNs Remembrance Day Ceremony will proceed as originally planned for Saturday, November 11th. 

The ceremony will commence at 10:55am with O Canada followed by the Rouse and 2 minutes of silence. 

All are welcome to attend and honor Our Fallen. 

We ask those attending to add a poppy to the large wreath at the memorial site. 

We apologize for any confusion or inconvenience caused and we look forward to seeing you there.

1 week ago

Miawpukek Mi'kamawey Mawi'omi

Each year, Canadian soldiers join Canadians as they mark Veterans’ Week from November 5 to 11. At commemorative ceremonies and events across the country, they come together to recognize veterans and military personnel past and present and to honor those who made the ultimate sacrifice on behalf of Canada.
The theme this year is Passchendaele 1917-2017, marking the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Passchendaele that raged in Belgium in the summer and fall of 1917.
Did you know?
• When Britain went to war in Europe in August 1914, Canada—as a member of the British Empire— automatically found itself at war as well.
• On a muddy battlefield in northwest Belgium, Canadians overcame almost unimaginable hardships to win an impressive victory in the fall of 1917.
• Canada’s great victory at Passchendaele came at a high price. More than 4,000 of our soldiers died in the fighting there and almost 12,000 were wounded.
• The Canadian Corps—after its great success at Vimy Ridge that April—was sent north to Belgium. It would be all-too-familiar ground for the Canadians who had seen heavy fighting there earlier in the war.
• The fighting at Passchendaele took great bravery. Nine Canadians earned the Victoria Cross (the highest award for military valour that a Canadian could earn) there. Two of its recipients sadly lost their lives in the battle.
• The Canadian victory at Passchendaele was truly impressive and added to our nation’s growing reputation as having the best offensive fighting force on the Western Front. This status meant that our forces would be at the forefront of the series of advances that eventually won the war for the Allies a year later.
• Each year, approximately 18 million poppies are distributed in communities across Canada. The money raised from donations provides direct assistance for Veterans.
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